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Dredd 3D *****

Miguel Juan Payán 20 Ago 2012
5517 veces

Dredd. An adaptation of the comic that brings good out of the 3D and is the Batman Begins of the Judge Dredd. Just that.

Dredd is a great starting point that defines the character and its surroundings perfectly without losing the spirit of the original but providing visual personality to adapt them to the cinema. Forget the version starring Sylvester Stallone in the 1990s. The first hit of Dredd is a way of presenting us the world of Megacity 1 by pulling on the texture of the documentary, which get us so much closer and more plausible in that futuristic environment, thus acquiring greater realism and narrative solvency. It is an exercise which at the time also gave very good results to Neill Blomkamp on District 9. It is just the opposite that made Judge Dredd, the version of the adventures of the character directed by Danny Cannon in 1995, which he opted to seek a visual spectacle from the outset rather than build a strong argument, and conducted by synergy with the star protagonist, attempted to make a kind of forced and little credible variant visual of Blade Runner in everything related to the environment. The Dredd without a helmet (anathema to any follower of the comic), Stallone played as a variant of his Demolition Man, turned all the likelihood of the environment and renounced make the most of the really interesting thing about comics character. In an attempt to recreate the bright color palette and stunning drawings of the comics by John Wagner and Carlos Ezquerra in 2000 A.D. comic magazine, Cannon fell into the trap of trying to apply the same visual cues to the cinema thinking, as stated at the time, to make "the Ben-Hur of science fiction". As own Judge Dredd would say: bad idea. The artificiality of the landscape of Judge Dredd, that feeling of mounted in a studio setting, was one of the ballast that production will not affect in any way Dredd. Pete Travis has chosen an approach much more realistic tones that serves to build an environment much more conducive and successful for the purposes pursued. That it has done spending significantly less money. Artificiality forced and plastic "made in Joel Schumacher" versions of Batman, killed the franchise giving the worst features of the film at the end of the 20th century and it was to come in the Christopher Nolan 21st century with new ideas and a visually much more solid approach that Batman could trace the flight brilliantly. Another both say Travis against Cannon for Dredd workflow.

The second visual element that stands out in Dredd is his work with 3D, one of the smarter uses of the real expressive possibilities of the three-dimensional film I've seen since Avatar. I am nothing amateur 3D for various reasons, but in the case of this film I think that they have been able to get juice, both scenes of persecution or action (in the initial persecution literally us gets in the car pursued by Dredd types) as in the scenes of the first arrest, trial and execution or the presentation of the character and Ma-Ma. Full effect of the new drug, which serves as a central element in the history is very well supported by the use of the 3D and this also serves to reinforce the presentation of characters. Three-dimensional is also something interesting to show the perceptions and special qualities as a psychic of Judge Anderson. Not to mention that the three-dimensional approach gets us more along with Dredd and Anderson in that building that is turning against the protagonists and appear to wrap them in a storm of violence, placing us in a kind of eye of the hurricane.

The third notable element in this version is one of those scripts that is able to combine a devilish tremendously entertaining dynamism in the exposure of information and no faults of pace, without breaks, at the time that boasts a remarkable economy of narrative media and footage time to introduce each character and the conflicts that arise between them. An example is the first sequence in which appears the rookie Judge Anderson and at the time presented to us that character, their background and their special qualities, the dialog helps present us with essential aspects of Judge Dredd on the other side of the glass. Another example is the closure of the theme of the first implementation of Anderson with a photo and the conflict it generates in the young aspiring judge. A fast, attack blunt and depth to the characters that allows the viewer to get more into the story without at any time decline the rapid pace of the story.

Finally, Lena Headey, the perverse Cersei Lannister of the a Game of Thrones series, reinvents itself in this character that is a brilliant exercise in antagonism to the actress brings a few nuances of totally corrupted innocence that are marked in his seductive eyes everytime you are about to commit some act of sadism as a feminine variant of the legendary gangster Al Capone, alias Scarface.

Visit Megacity 1 in Dredd is one of the best therapies to overcome the end of vacations.

Miguel Juan Payán

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Modificado por última vez en Miércoles, 05 Septiembre 2012 09:52
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